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Mystery Glider

Raffaello


Can anyone help me to identify the glider shown in the picture, held by a very young me? Only thing I remember, it was given to my father by some fellow modeler, but it was too hot a slope ship either for me or for dad - so it was swapped again for some easier to fly, powered model (that didn't last long, by the way). That was back in late '70s / early '80s. I was fascinated by this unpowered but fast and aerobatic plane, by its big tailfin and the thick, submarine-like fuselage. Now that, after many years, I'm back to modeling and have become an avid sloper, I'd be happy to have the mysterious sailplane back and fly it; but the only way is to find the glider's plans and build one.
 

Fortunately, I found this old photo inside a drawer in my parents' house (regrettably bady scratched) and I thought, Outerzone readers could help me identify the project and, well, maybe, find the plans. Please note the Union Jack on the tailfin - it was Skyleader's symbol, a British company marketing radio control sets that were widely used in Italy at the time. (I've recently found in a closet in the same house my yellow Skyleader TX from the late '70s, and I'm planning to restore the old box and accommodate inside it a 2.4 GHz tx module ... but that's another story...)
 

I don't remember the name of the plane, neither the designer or the company who marketed it. But sometimes, a bit of luck... Thank in advance to all the Outerzone readers!
 

Raffaello, Genoa, Italy
July 2018
 


 


 


 


 

User comments

It's difficult to see the model in Rafaello's photograph and he hasn't given any clues as to wingspan, planform or a date for the model, but the profile looks suspiciously like the Baloney, a slope soarer featured as a plan in the January 1976 RCM&E magazine. The Baloney had a parallel chord, swept back, semi-symetrical wing of 48" span, located midway on a diamond sectioned crutch based fuselage. I had a photocopy of the plan and article and drew up a powered version to suit a .15 glow. It flew fast but, due to the rather large removeable top section over the midwing (for access to the radio gear), was a bit weak and therefore was not one of my longest surviving models! I still have the photocopy, with the dubious enhancement of a major blob of dried 'O' negative, added when it was on the back of my car during a road accident 39 years ago! We both bear the scars!! Hope this helps Raffaello and many thanks to you both for the terrific Outerzone site.
Roger_Harpenden_UK - 16/01/2019
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