Radi-O-Too

 

Radi-O-Too - plan thumbnail image

Radi-O-Too - completed model photo

Radi-O-Too  
by Herb Clukey
from American Aircraft Modeler
November 1961 
24in span
Tags: IC F/F R/C Biplane
all formers complete :)
got article :)


This plan was found online 05/09/2017 at: https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showpost.php?p=38178620&postcount=16190
Outerzone planID: oz9175 | Filesize: 501KB | Format: • PDFbitmap • PDFvector | Credit*: buzzardbait, dfritzke, hogal

   

About this Plan

Radi-O-Too - Compact 1/4A class biplane for R/C. May also be flown free-flight. Total wing area 188 sq in.

Note this is a low resolution plan. Hopefully a clearer scan will surface at some point. Until then, for more detail see the supplement file, hogal's excellent PDFvector tracing.

Added PDFvector plan tracing, thanks to hogal.

Update 12/09/2017: Replaced this plan with a clearer copy, thanks to dfritzke. Quote: - "A better scan, still just scanned from the magazine, though. Dave "

Update 13/09/2017: added brief article, thanks to Pit.

Supplementary files

PDF vector tracing (hogal).
Previous scan version.
Article page.

Corrections?

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User comments

I was wondering when this aircraft would surface. When I was a young teen back in the early 60s plans for this plane were included in one of the model magazines I subscribed to ... probably Model Airplane News. As they were only magazine page size I took a few days to draft them up to the 24 inch span and then started scratch building. Kids couldn't afford RC gear in those days as it was huge money so I built it up as a free flight. Then I got my driver's license so it sat around for a few years as model planes took a back seat. I gave it to a young kid I knew who put in a Baby Bee .049 and I saw it fly once. It was a pretty looking biplane with nice proportions that flew reasonably well. Would probably make a nice electric three channel for today's use, or put ailerons on the lower wing.
SteveC - 11/09/2017
I remember this magazine but never considered building the model because of its small size, waaaay too tiny for my radio gear. I had a Berkeley Aero-Trol, bought mail order from America's Hobby Center in New York, and it turned out to be a hopeless piece of crap. It featured a single tube receiver, multiple expensive batteries and a crude escapement that never worked, even on the bench. Besides that, the whole concept was out of date by at least ten years, AHC dumping the remains at a cheap price. Don't remember the cost but it was a big wasted chunk of my paper route money. Another year went by until I was able to acquire a real, working R/C system. But that's not the subject, it's the magazine listed as American Aircraft Modeler, incorrect for 1961. For many years, the title was American Modeler, so why the change? In the early to mid sixties, the slot car phenomenon hit the modeling world, and slot car tracks sprouted like weeds in strip malls everywhere. Some of the model magazines carried a couple of pages on slot cars and a few ads too, but not like American Modeler, who rapidly went all-out into the slot car craze. Soon, that's all there was, no airplanes were to found inside the covers. Hobby shop sales dropped to zero among modelers and subscriptions plummeted. Then the predictable came to pass, the go-fast boys took over and ruined the event like they always do. It got to the point where, if you wanted to be competitive with your slot car, you had to send your cheap little Mabuchi motor off to a guru in California to get it reworked for more power. At that time, my brother, who ran slot cars, packed his in and wished them well. Sometime about '65 or '66, the entire slot car movement died suddenly, tracks shut down and it was all over. Somewhere in the USA there must be a slot car track still in use, frequented by aging hippies clad in ponytails and bell bottoms, but I haven't seen one in decades. Now, what did this do for American Modeler, without ad revenue from defunct slot producers, and no readers from the airplane guys? Simple, just change your name to American Aircraft Modeler and say "never mind". It didn't work of course, modelers being a non-forgiving bunch, not willing to risk another worthless subscription. AAM hung on for another couple of years but eventually faded into obscurity after their financing ran out. And that's the rest of the story, with credit to Paul Harvey.
DougSmith - 14/09/2017
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Notes

* Credit field

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Scaling

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