Hornet (oz5419)

 

Hornet (oz5419) by Noel Rozelle from RCMplans 1977 - plan thumbnail

About this Plan

Hornet. Radio control sport model for 1/2A power. Noel Rozelle's Hornet from RCM magazine issue 10-77.

Quote: "How would you like to spend a lot less time building? How would you like to use a pint of fuel on a weekend instead of a gallon? How would you like to go to your flying site and carry everything you need for the day in one hand, unless you carry a six-pack in the other, strictly for balance of course? How would you like to enjoy R/C once again because you're not going to worry about how much it costs you to pursue this hobby, or have the constant threat of an expensive crash hanging over your head?

If you answered yes to the above questions, you're ready for a Hornet.

1/2A flying is really coming into its own lately and there are a lot of reasons why. The reasons above are some, but there are many more. It's really a switch to be able to have a brand new airplane with motor ready to fly for less than thirty bucks and one that finally costs you less in gas than most .60's need for priming and, how aboul this - a small airplane that actually performs, not just stays in the sky and struggles around.

Let's go one step further - there are a lot of hot .049 planes around for racing and even some for pattern and most of these do a great job. But what about us knock-around fun-fliers who haven't got the interest in those events? What about the guy who just wants to go out and have a ball with as little fuss and expense as possible, the guy who wants a good flying, stable plane he can give his kid some stick time on without having to build the trainer that he'll probably never get around to anyway?

If you fall into one of the above categories, you're ready for a Hornet. It's a new 1/2A just for the fun of it and no special reason. It has very simple, fast and strong construction. It looks good and it's not cramped for radio space. The wing design gives it a glide you won't believe for setting up those dead stick landings everyone is so scared of on 1/2A's because a lot of small planes have a habit of just falling out of the sky when the fan quits - but not the Hornet.

It might sound like I'm going over-board a little on this, but the Hornet has been a lot of fun for everyone who has tried one. One of my friends goes out on the dirt roads near his home alter work and flies till dark several days a week. Every time three or four of us get together at a local school soccer field, we end up drifting into a very familiar left hand circle around the goal posts until we run out of gas and argue for hours about who cut the most pylons.

I could go on for a long time about the Hornet, but it all boils down to one thing, the Hornet is fun and if you don't believe it, just build one.

Fuselage Construction. Cut the fuselage sides from 1/8 x 3 x 36 in balsa sheet, saving the excess for bottom sheeting. Next mark the positions of the bulkheads on the inside of the fuselage halves and drill the 3/16 wing dowel holes. From 3/16 stook, cut all longerons and glue them along the top and bottom of the fuselage halves..."

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Supplementary file notes

Article pages, text and pics.

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Hornet (oz5419) by Noel Rozelle from RCMplans 1977 - model pic

Datafile:
  • (oz5419)
    Hornet
    by Noel Rozelle
    from RCMplans (ref:705)
    October 1977 
    37in span
    IC R/C
    all formers complete :)
    got article :)
  • Submitted: 19/03/2014
    Filesize: 384KB
    Format: • PDFbitmap
    Credit*: theshadow

Hornet (oz5419) by Noel Rozelle from RCMplans 1977 - pic 003.jpg
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Hornet (oz5419) by Noel Rozelle from RCMplans 1977 - pic 004.jpg
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Hornet (oz5419) by Noel Rozelle from RCMplans 1977 - pic 005.jpg
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Hornet (oz5419) by Noel Rozelle from RCMplans 1977 - pic 006.jpg
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Hornet (oz5419) by Noel Rozelle from RCMplans 1977 - pic 007.jpg
007.jpg

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User comments

Hi Steve, I found this plan (The Hornet) on your site and I found it a nice little, cheap plane. So I’ve build one and put it on electro. I’ve used the following setup: Electric motor is a SK3 2836 1500kV op. A regular speedcontroller of 30A, prop is an electric APC 7x6. Lipo’s are 850 mAh, 3S, 45C. I’ve calculated this with eCalc and it promised me a nice power-weight ratio of 2:1 with a top speed round 134 km/h (that is 83 mph). A nice speed but not bloody fast but with an unlimited vertical climb. That was the goal I was aiming for and this setup does this exactly. Unfortunately after 4 minutes battery time is up… I’ve used 12 gr metalgear digital servo’s, the elevator servo goes in the tail for CG reasons. Below is a picture of my electric Hornet [see more pics 004]. Cheers,
DriesNeyrinck - 25/08/2014
Hi, I've sent a few pictures of a recent build from RCM/Outerzone plans [pics 005-007]. The Hornet has been converted for electric power instead of the Cox .049 engine. Electric set-up is as follows:
Power UP 450 Speed 1500KV, Sky Power 30 Amp ESC, 3 Cell Lipo 1300Mah,APC 7x6E or 8x8E Speed.
For more build details see http://tslidehaven.com/a%20tale...
JohnnyB - 09/09/2019
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