Dragon (oz3045)

 

Dragon (oz3045) by Alfred Neuhaus from RCMplans 1979 - plan thumbnail

About this Plan

Dragon. Radio control canard pusher sport model, K&B 40 engine shown.

Quote: "When they see the Dragon for the first time most people ask which direction it flies. Comments about this unusual model are enjoyable to listen to but best of all is watching it perform in the air. If anyone wants to bet it won't fly, take them up on it as it does fly and very well at that.

The design credit really belongs to the early aviation pioneers who thought the birds were ignorant and believed that the proper place for the pitch control was at the front of the flying machine. If set up properly, this does afford some advantage, such as preventing violent stalls as we have come to know and love them as part of the tail-aft type of configuration. With four degrees positive angle of attack of the canard surface, it will stall before the wing, and drops to a lesser angle and continues flying. Of course the wing will continue to provide lilt through this cycle. If the aircraft is placed in a steep climb attitude it can be forced into a stalled condition, but makes a rapid recovery. In level flight with power off, if up elevator is fed in gradually, the altitude of the plane becomes alternating nose high, to level, in a gentle bobbing motion. Aileron and rudder controls remain effective.

Landings may be made with full back elevator and the descent rate adjusted with the throttle, causing the Dragon to appear like a Navy carrier aircraft coming home. If the speed is kept higher a more normal landing is easily done as the pitch and directional control is very positive.

Hanging the engine at the back end was done for several reasons, such as, the airplane stays clean - after flying just wipe the prop off. Also the prop does not get broken or get to eat things that you may taxi into.

Construction is conventional and either a foam or balsa built-up wing can be utilized. If your choice is foam, use the tip and root rib patterns for the core templates, and remember to set up for the proper sweepback angle..."

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Dragon (oz3045) by Alfred Neuhaus from RCMplans 1979 - model pic

Datafile:
  • (oz3045)
    Dragon
    by Alfred Neuhaus
    from RCMplans (ref:762)
    December 1979 
    50in span
    IC R/C Pusher
    all formers complete :)
    got article :)
  • Submitted: 06/11/2014
    Filesize: 1030KB
    Format: • PDFbitmap
    Credit*: JJ

Dragon (oz3045) by Alfred Neuhaus from RCMplans 1979 - pic 003.jpg
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Dragon (oz3045) by Alfred Neuhaus from RCMplans 1979 - pic 004.jpg
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* Credit field

The Credit field in the Outerzone database is designed to recognise and credit the hard work done in scanning and digitally cleaning these vintage and old timer model aircraft plans to get them into a usable format. Currently, it is also used to credit people simply for uploading the plan to a forum on the internet. Which is not quite the same thing. This will change soon. Probably.

Scaling

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