Mini Jaded Maid

 

Mini Jaded Maid - plan thumbnail image

Mini Jaded Maid - completed model photo

Mini Jaded Maid  
by Tony Brookes
from Aeromodeller
1990 
24in span
Tags: CO2 F/F Pylon
all formers complete :)
got article :)


This plan was found online 13/04/2012 at: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showpost.php?p=21250532&postcount=332
Outerzone planID: oz2755 | Filesize: 215KB | Format: • PDFbitmap | Credit*: algy2, DBHL, theshadow

   

About this Plan

Mini Jaded Maid. A later reduced-size version of the classic Norman Marcus Jaded Maid (oz869) design originally from 1941. Here, for CO2 power with 24 in span. Plan shows a parachute dethermaliser.

Quote: "It may seem discourteous for someone like me, who nowadays does very little contest flying, to offer criticism of contest rules. Nevertheless, it was a strong feeling that something is wrong that provided some of the motivation for this model, and to ignore that would be to present a false picture. The following is best read with that in mind.

One major objection to the SMAE Vintage rules is the way that the publication requirement is unnecessarily combined with the cut off date. There is an obvious need for both, but there is a strong case for keeping them distinct. In 1950 and earlier nobody could have foreseen that there would ever be a Vintage class for which their designs might qualify, and certainly there was no reason to suppose that tardiness in getting a design published would have regrettable consequences thirty years and more in the future.

But that is what has happened. A number of designs which achieved success and fame in 1950 or earlier were not published until well into 1951. Any reasonable person would say that they ought to qualify as Vintage. The publication requirement itself makes sense since there must be some sort of reference point which determines whether a model has been built as the designer intended. Nevertheless it does seem reasonable that where a design was published after the cut off date, proof that it was built and flown before that date should suffice to qualify it.

Such a case is Jaded Maid, a contest power design by Norman Marcus which collected him a cabinet full of trophies in 1950 (and again in 1951). In May 1951 Aeromodeller announced it with a degree of hype which confirms that it had already attracted a great deal of favourable attention. 'Another Aeromodeller scoop... the model YOU have requested...' and more in similar vein, Jaded Maid is one of the last great designs of the Vintage period, and to disqualify if on purely technical grounds seems all wrong.

It was in an attempt to remedy this injustice to a limited extent that Jaded Maid was chosen as a subject for a CO2 miniature. That however, is not the whole story. It still had to meet cri-teria for scaling down, or the project would have been abandoned with great regret. Among the things to be taken into account are these:

First of all, a straightforward approach to structural design is essential. Any complexities of structure become very much more difficult to cope with when scaled down. Secondly, an aspect ratio of not more than 7.5 is desirable. This will usually result in a realistic wing chord in the miniature. Wings which scale down to a chord of less than three inches can lead to very disappointing performance. Lift/drag ratios fall off alarmingly in smaller wings than that. Thirdly, a chance, at least, of building the model down to a target weight of 1.75 ounces or less is a good thing. Finally, it is nice if the design needs little or no modification to take a CO2 installation.

Jaded Maid has a typical no-nonsense Marcus approach to structure. No problems there. At 7.58 the aspect ratio is just above that arbitrary limit, but since the limit is arbitrary one may stretch a point. Then much of the success of the original model was attributed at the time to its exceptionally light weight, which is encouraging. As for the motor installation, the original had its Eflin 2.49 anchored to a massive radial mount made from quarter-inch ply and strapped in place with rubber bands in the Frank Ehling manner. This is idea, since the mounting modifications (which are consid-erable) can be strictly localised. The only other necessary change is to lengthen the undercarriage leg to accommodate a proportionally larger prop.

The build-up. In his original write-up, Norman refused to give building instructions on the very sensible grounds that anyone who needed them ought not to be building a high performance model anyway. No such excuse is available here, since CO2 miniatures are quite suitable for the inexperienced, so here goes.

Wood selection is always crucial in a model like this. Where soft balsa is specified it must be the very soft but very strong kind,the sort you can dent with your fingertips but which still doesn't break easily in cross grain tension. Your rib stock must be true quarter sawn, with the radial grain showing as stripes, not as blotches, on the surface. The hard balsa should be like spruce. It often pays to start by cutting out all the sheet parts. There is nothing like getting the tedious part of the job over first. If you are of that opinion, then you might well decide to build the fin first of all. All it requires is the pinning down and butting together of three pieces of balsa sheet. Note the grain direction - it matters. The early completion of a major component, even the smallest one, creates a wonder-ful illusion of progress. The fuselage is best started with the pylon. Pin down the strip parts and add the shaped sheet pieces at the front and rear..."

Update 17/03/2018: Added article, thanks to Algy2.

Update 12/09/2018: Replaced this plan with a clearer copy, thanks to DBHL, theshadow.

Scan from DBHL, cleanup by theshadow.

ref DBHL-6756.

Direct submission to Outerzone.

Supplementary files

Article.
Previous scan version.

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Notes

* Credit field

The Credit field in the Outerzone database is designed to recognise and credit the hard work done in scanning and digitally cleaning these vintage and old timer model aircraft plans to get them into a usable format. Currently, it is also used to credit people simply for uploading the plan to a forum on the internet. Which is not quite the same thing. This will change soon. Probably.

Scaling

This model plan (like all plans on Outerzone) is supposedly scaled correctly and supposedly will print out nicely at the right size. But that doesn't always happen. If you are about to start building a model plane using this free plan, you are strongly advised to check the scaling very, very carefully before cutting any balsa wood.

 

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