Speedy Bee

 

Speedy Bee - plan thumbnail image

Speedy Bee - completed model photo more pics (3)

Speedy Bee  
by Andy Clancy
from Clancy Aviation, RCMplans (ref:1218)
July 1996 
40in span
Tags: IC Electric R/C Floatplane
all formers complete :)
got article :)


This plan was found online 24/01/2012 at: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showpost.php?p=10476900&postcount=12
Outerzone planID: oz2315 | Filesize: 1135KB | Format: • PDFbitmap | Credit*: dsaturday, JedBond

   

About this Plan

Speedy Bee. Sport model for radio control. This plan was published in RCM and the kit was later sold by Clancy Aviation.

Quote: "Are you tired of planes that all look alike? Would you like to fly more but you don't like the long drive to the flying field? Well, have I got a plane for you! The Speedy Bee can be flown almost anywhere - you don't land it, you park Wits spring landing gear and balloon wheels allow it to fly from terrain more suited to R/C off-road cars than air-planes. Even though you may be able to fly it in your backyard, the Speedy Bee is such an attention getter, you'll want to take it to the flying field at least once.

With its low wing loading and mild control throws, its fairly easy to fly. But beware - this is no trainer! With maximum control throws, its responsive agility will satisfy even the most demanding pros. I flew my prototype with an 0.S. 26 Surpass 4-stroke and with the Model Electronics Turbo 10 electric motor. The plane performed well with both power plants, and any engine in the .09 to .26 range should fly it just fine. I use the DAD Tina microservos in my plane. They are probably the best buy in microservos today. Standard size servos could be used with a gas powered Speedy Bee, but the extra weight will increase your stall speed. I don't recommend using standard servos for an electric powered Speedy Bee. To save weight, I always use a 250 mAh receiver battery pack.

Electrification Modifications: I flow my Speedy Bee with the Model Electronics Turbo 10 System. No BEC was used. With ten 1700 mAh cells, it had ballistic performance. It is shocking to see an electric plane take off in under 20 feet and climb out vertically until nearly out of sight! A typical comment heard from other modelers while watching this electric-powered hot rod was: Gee, what kind of muffler are you using?

The drawback to this set-up is that it is a little heavy, so I tried using just 7-cells. The stall speed was noticeably slower and the performance was still impressive. I think an ideal set-up would be a 10-cell 1000 mAh battery pack and a BEC with the Turbo 10 motor.

I used the motor mount supplied by Model Electronics and I highly recommend it. The motor requires several degrees of up thrust and side thrust because of the high thrust line and the huge amount or torque. The battery pack was mounted on a 1/16 plywood shelf using plenty of Velcro. The shelf is glued on top of the lowest stringers and should be as long as the longest battery pack used. The shelf should be centered about the plane's balance point so that using different sized battery packs won't change the CG. A battery access door can be built into the side of the fuselage. I used an external charging jack. The dummy V-4 motor you see in the photos was made from Cox .020 heads, Peck Polymer's plastic cylinders, some aluminium tubing..."

Update 20/04/12: Added full (4 sheets) build instructions, courtesy of JedBond.

Update 21/07/2016: Added article pages, thanks to Cavitation.

Update 02/11/2016: added 20 page build manual, thanks to BerndLangner.

Update 07/06/2018: added kit review from AMI, September 1997, thanks to RFJ.

Supplementary files

Kit instructions from Clancy Aviation.
Article from RCM.
20 page build manual.
Kit review.

Corrections?

Did we get something wrong with this plan? That happens sometimes. Help us make a correction

 

User comments

No comments yet for this plan. Got something to say about this one? Click here to Add a comment

 

Notes

* Credit field

The Credit field in the Outerzone database is designed to recognise and credit the hard work done in scanning and digitally cleaning these vintage and old timer model aircraft plans to get them into a usable format. Currently, it is also used to credit people simply for uploading the plan to a forum on the internet. Which is not quite the same thing. This will change soon. Probably.

Scaling

This model plan (like all plans on Outerzone) is supposedly scaled correctly and supposedly will print out nicely at the right size. But that doesn't always happen. If you are about to start building a model plane using this free plan, you are strongly advised to check the scaling very, very carefully before cutting any balsa wood.

 

Terms of Use

© Outerzone, 2011-2018.

All content is free to download for personal use.

For non-personal use and/or publication: plans, photos, excerpts, links etc may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Outerzone with appropriate and specific direction to the original content i.e. a direct hyperlink back to the Outerzone source page.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site's owner is strictly prohibited. If we discover that content is being stolen, we will consider filing a formal DMCA notice.