Sheet Metal Susie (oz2164)

 

Sheet Metal Susie (oz2164) by Roy Clough from Young Men 1958 - plan thumbnail

About this Plan

Sheet Metal Susie. All aluminium model, for control line.

Quote: "Suzie looks like a rather complex bit of sheet metal work, but actually this gleaming aluminum beauty can be yours at a cost of so little time and effort that you won't believe it until you try.

The trick is the use of simple basic geometry which will distort naturally into the shape we desire. We squeeze the ends of a cylinder and there is our fuselage; we draw together the sides of a right angle and there is our wing section.

The main disadvantage of sheet metal models is the effect that high frequency engine vibration has upon metal-to-metal junctures. This punishing vibration will erode or fatigue the toughest metal in a short time. Add to this the rough shocks of repeated landings and it is easy to understand why the operating life of metal models of the past has been brief.

Suzie was designed with the elimination of this weakness as a major point of effort. Note: there are no direct metalto- metal component junctures; no points where metal can chatter against metal, and no points where heavy mass or flight loads fall upon flat, or unsupported sheet metal areas, in concentrated fashion. Engine vibration is isolated and absorbed by a wood bulkhead, which also takes landing shocks; the wings are attached to a wooden spar, as are the tail surfaces, the wood in turn being attached to the fuselage. The result of this type of construction is a model which will still be flying years from the time you build it—provided you don't run it into stonewalls too often.

How about the weight? We won't kid you. Suzie is fabricated from .019 aluminum sheet and this stuff isn't microfilm. She squats on the takeoff line with a full tank at 24 oz, and uses up one-third to half a circle to get airborne with a Cub .14 - the smallest engine you should use. Once aloft, however, she flies as good as any sport-type model with an elevator response, climb and dive, which belies its weight. When the engine quits Suzie whistles into a high-momentum glide as flat as a tabletop and keeps pulling on the lines until she stops rolling. You'll like her.

Construction: Stop in at your local building material outlet and ask for a couple feet of 24 inch aluminum flashing. This shouldn't cost over 75c. This stuff should mike about .019; don't get the heavy-duty .024 grade.

Note that this material has a 'grain,' that is the long way and you'll get a better and easier job by observing the lay of the metal. Cut out a piece 18 x 10 in and roll this into a cylinder, then get your perimeter dimension by setting the bulkhead in place in one end, mark and then remove the bulkhead, line up the cylinder, prick and drill and bolt the edges together with 1/4 in round head 4-40 bolts and nuts. (Riveting is okay if you have the equipment.)

Now observe the inside edge of the lap joint; this must come at the bottom right (outside) fuselage. With this in mind gently squeeze the tube into shape to receive the tailpiece, the wood rudder, and bolt this in place. Run a #3 drill through the sides, taking care to be perpendicular to the rudder piece and then carefully slit the fuselage as shown and bend the resulting tab upward on each side. Drill and bolt the hardwood stabilizer to these tabs - a modicum of bending is permissible if necessary for good alignment.

Set the fuselage aside and make up the engine - mount bulkhead - tank - landing gear assembly. This is a separate and independent unit and note that the engine shaft will be off-center to the left; regardless of what engine you use, the shaft position will be dictated by having just the glow plug tip project beyond the fuselage side..."

Note this is not a full-size plan.

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Sheet Metal Susie (oz2164) by Roy Clough from Young Men 1958 - model pic

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