Pegna PC1 (oz15089)

 

Pegna PC1 (oz15089) by John Walker 1979 - plan thumbnail

About this Plan

Pegna PC1. Peanut scale model for rubber power.

Quote: "An unusual, yet good-flying model of a full-size Italian aircraft designed for the 1921 Schneider Cup Race. Pegna PC1, by John Walker.

Shades of Bill Barnes and his SILVER LANCER - but what's this? The 1921 dateline precedes the famous BB1 by at least 15 years. Was it for real? Well, yes and no. The plane was designed by a very imaginative Italian, Giovanni Pegna, who owned the publication L'Aeronautica. The plane's sole reason for being was to win the 1921 Schneider Cup Race.

It seems that the bulky flying boats and pontoon-equipped aircraft were the usual fare for these races. Airports were small in those days and aircraft were not fitted with flaps and reversible props to slow them down and shorten the takeoff and landing run. These planes needed plenty of room.

The conventional Schneider Cup racing planes had plenty of built-in headwind. If you ever visit the NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM, you'll see what I mean. Jimmy Doo-little's Curtiss R3C-2 that won the 1925 race is on display.

Well, anyway Pegna, in his study of aero and hydrodynamics, knew that 'sharp noses reduce drag.' His idea was to reduce bulk and drag to a minimum, hence the Pc1. No floats or wires were to be used to cut speed. The plane was to sit shoulder deep in the water. To take off and land, the engine was raised to permit the propeller to clear the water.

No, it never flew. Construction was started but a shortage of funds halted the project after quite a bit of time was spent in designing the hull and motor pivoting mechanism. If you want to read more about this plane and others like it, I recommend THE SPEED SEEKERS, by Thomas G. Foxworth. It is published by Doubleday & Company, Inc.

The proportions of this aircraft make the Pegna an ideal Peanut. I know that for contest work, the model must be patterned after a real plane that flew. However, how many of you fly in contests? This plane is interesting and enjoyable to fly when you want to soothe the tattered nerves after a day in the rat race.

BUILDING THE MODEL: As with any model (or real plane, for that matter), the idea is to build it as light as possible while meeting flight and strength criteria. The plans indicate 1/16 sq for the fuselage structure. You can use 1/20 sq if it is available; it will help in building-in lightness. Cyanoacrylate adhesive was used to assemble the model.

The fuselage cannot be completed until the wing and rudder are added. The wing is unique in Peanut size because of the curve of the leading and trailing edge. They are built using the Mooney technique for laminating thin wood strips. It isn't as difficult as it looks. The multi-chord wing is readily taken care of by making a plywood pattern of the rib at the center section (shown on side view of fuselage) and slicing the required number of ribs. They are trimmed to length and cemented into place. Note that the spar is not full length; however, the wing will still be plenty strong.

Cover the model with red tissue and shrink the covering with denatured alcohol. Two thinned coats (50-50) of Sig Lite Cote dope will seal the tissue. Trim the exposed wood with matching red dope. Control outlines can be drawn with India ink or by using 1/32 trimming tape. The large radiator can be made using broom straws or dried grass and painting them bronze. The original model had a 'painted on' radiator to cut down weight..."

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Pegna PC1 (oz15089) by John Walker 1979 - model pic

Datafile:
  • (oz15089)
    Pegna PC1
    by John Walker
    from Model Builder
    June 1979 
    13in span
    Scale Rubber F/F
    clean :)
    all formers complete :)
    got article :)
  • Submitted: 15/01/2024
    Filesize: 187KB
    Format: • PDFbitmap
    Credit*: IanSalmon
    Downloads: 277

ScaleType:
  • NotFound | help

    This is a scale plan, but ScaleType is set as NotFound.

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Pegna PC1 (oz15089) by John Walker 1979 - pic 003.jpg
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Pegna PC1 (oz15089) by John Walker 1979 - pic 004.jpg
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User comments

Volare Products has a blog page on the Pegna PC1 here:
https://volareproducts.com/blog/?page_id=3034
The Piaggio-Pegna P.C.7 looks like a fun build also.
RogerB - 04/02/2024
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Scaling

This model plan (like all plans on Outerzone) is supposedly scaled correctly and supposedly will print out nicely at the right size. But that doesn't always happen. If you are about to start building a model plane using this free plan, you are strongly advised to check the scaling very, very carefully before cutting any balsa wood.

 

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