Easy Rider (oz11312)

 

Easy Rider - plan thumbnail image

About this Plan

Easy Rider. Outdoor HLG.

Quote: "Easy Rider OHLG, by Michael Arak. Over ten years in the development stages, our Outdoor Hand Launch Glider is a real winner. Simple and basic in design, it combines all the elements necessary for a contest winner or for the fellow who just likes to test his throwing arm! Build it and then go try for that errant thermal.

Over a period of ten years I have developed a Hand Launch Glider design that has been in the winner's circle many times. I like to think that the success of 'Easy Rider' is due not to luck, but to a sensible design and development program. Every detail of this design has a purpose, either for quick construction or for better flying. I'll explain some of my reasoning:

1) The wing has a constant chord with a radius tip shape, obviously for construc-tion purposes. An elliptical planform is theoretically more efficient, but I've found that a thermal (and very few contests are won without one or two) 'cannot tell the difference.

2) The profile fuselage evolved after carving many spruce or balsa types that usually ended up with too much flex, or with weak spots. With the 1/8 brass, no carving is necessary as the taper of the boom gives exactly the right amount of stress and flex. The nose piece, added when wings started peeling off, has eliminated this problem.

3) The fin is the only surface used for flight trim; more on this later.

4) The stabilizer is the best feature. Some time ago, I realized that although I was building the same design time after time, some gliders flew better than others. This could be seen (and felt) mainly in the launch. Eventually I realized that the gliders flew best when the desirable 0-0 incidence was built into the glider, and was not achieved by warping the stab trailing edge up or down. The reason for this is that such warps have different effects at different speeds, and warps usually do not stay properly warped. Incidence can be accidentally built in by using a slightly curved fuselage blank, or by not gluing the wing or stab on squarely. The solution was simple: make a stab with adjustable incidence and adjust for a 0-0 setting by test flying. For once my theory worked. With this feature, you know every glider will fly perfectly (well, almost!).

5) Launching is the last detail, and will be explained later. First, let's build an Easy Rider.

Construction: Start with the wing. Select a piece of 3/16 contest balsa, quarter grained if available, or if not, a piece with straight grain that runs parallel to the leading and trailing edges. If you really want to make it easy, or if you are a beginner, use Sig tapered sheet. This is a 3 in wide sheet that is already carved to a taper from the high point of the airfoil to the trailing edge. All you have to carve is the front of the airfoil and the tips. Just pick a piece that is fairly light. By doing this, you can make the entire wing in 15 minutes, with a negligible sacrifice in weight.

Either way, lay out the wing outline and the dihedral lines on the bottom of the blank. Radius the tips and carve the airfoil. Taper the tips as shown in the front view, and sand the wing smooth. Cut the dihedral 'breaks, making sure the cuts are perpendicular to the leading edge. Sand the bevels for the proper angles. Poke a sharp pencil into the end grain of the bevel about 1/8 in deep (three or four pokes, about 1/2 in apart), then pre-glue and glue the wing pieces together at the angles shown..."

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