Miss Cosmic Wind oz10777

 

Miss Cosmic Wind - plan thumbnail image

Miss Cosmic Wind - completed model photo

Submitted to Outerzone: 31/12/2018
Outerzone planID: oz10777 | Filesize: 757KB | Format: • PDFbitmap | Credit*: Circlip, RFJ

   

About this Plan

Miss Cosmic Wind. Radio control pylon recer, for Super-Tigre G 40 engine.

Quote: "Fast, fast, fast! - we had hoped to tell you that this bird won Formula One at the plats but an unfortunate combination of the caller and plane being hit ended the whole thing! Cosmic Wind, by Jerry Wagner.

Cosmic Wind - or at least that's what the Hirsch drawings call it. We've also heard it called 'Miss Cosmic Wind' and 'Cosmic Wind 4.' Apparently, this version of the airplane wasn't very successful as a full scale racer, but it makes a fine Formula I model.

Since this is a competition model, it seems appropriate to quote the track record so the reader can decide whether or not to press on with the article.

The Cosmic Wind was completed externally in time to be entered in the 1971 WRAMS show, where it won first in the Pylon division. However, it was June 1971 before we finished the inside and flew it. With our usual approach, we test-flew it the evening before the June Nor'East air races. With three flights on it we were off to the wars. At Granby, Connecticut, it won four straight heats and a flyoff, then four straight heats at Hadley, Massachusetts. Then came the NE champs at Orange, Massachusetts. We blew a plug at eight laps, and got a zero in the first heat. Won the second, maybe won the third (I still don't know), won the fourth, and got a 'no start' in the fifth. (Ask some of my buddies about that - I blush too much.)

It then won four straight and a fly-off at Granby in August and eight straight at the season's closing meet at Granby. Best time for the season was 1:36.9. During the winter of 1971-72 we built a new wing because the original wing flexed horribly in the turns. As usual, we test-flew the day before the Hadley meet this season. One test flight indicated that it was the same old airplane, so off we went again. At the first meet it won five straight heats and a barn-burner of a fly-off with Mike Helsel and Sam Griswold. Time for this was 1:33.2. A week later at Granby it won four straight and then Cliff Telford and Bob Violett punctured our balloon. We took second in the fifth heat. Well, if it's time to go, that's the way to go - whipped by an almost identical Cosmic Wind and the present World Champs! Their time was 1:36.4. We got off one second behind, and finished two tenths behind.

If the Cosmic Wind seems like a good airplane so far, consider this - the record was run up without benefit of a super-pilot or a super-engine. The pilot doesn't practice enough, and is operating with nearly forty-year-old eye-balls (nearsighted, too), reflexes and nerves. A Bob Smith he definitely ain't. The engine is a Super-Tigre G 40, purchased about April, 1971, It came with a Rat race carb and high compression head, so it's probably a late model. We cleaned it up some, worked on compression ratio and rotary valve timing, and it tached 18,400 on a 9-6 Super 'M' in the rain. Why not? We usually fly in the rain. It's not the hottest engine around but it's consistent. We blew two plugs, one completely, one partially, due to an excessively tight piston-cylinder fit before we freed it up slightly. Now the plugs are just slightly scrambled after a run on 55% nitro.

If the airplane is that good, why doesn't everybody have one? Simple - there are no kits available, although Bob Violett's version may be on the market soon, and its' a tough airplane to build. Would you believe something like ten feet of fillet?

Now, we would like to explain why the airplane is so fast. We certainly would like to, but we can't. We don't know! We think that the solid, one piece construction helps engine performance, and that the laminar-type airfoil helps top speed. We do know that the Cosmic Wind is the easiest-to-fly Formula I airplane we've built. It's smooth and predictable and turns well. With the new wing, we've hung a few tight No.1 turns and it goes through level and comes out level.

Landing characteristics are completely safe. We've made flared-out landings several feet too high, and it just sinks straight ahead, and at worst bends the landing gear slightly. The washout is incorporated primarily for high speed performance in the hope that it unloads the wing tips and reduces tip vortex drag, but it sure is handy on the landings, too..."

Miss Cosmic Wind, MAN, November 1972.

Note this is a low resolution plan.

Direct submission to Outerzone.

Supplementary files

Article pages, thanks to RFJ.

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oz10777 datafile

Miss Cosmic Wind  
by Jerry Wagner
from Model Airplane News
November 1972 
50in span
Tags: Scale IC R/C Racer Civil
all formers complete :)
got article :)

 

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