1954 Wakefield (oz10696)

 

1954 Wakefield (oz10696) by Ron Warring from Model Airplane News 1953 - plan thumbnail

About this Plan

1954 Wakefield. Rubber competition model.

Quote: "When the Wakefield rules were radically revised to limit motor weight to 2.82 ounces, MAN asked one of the world's most respected designers and writers on the subject to prepare this analysis and accompanying plane drawings. The 1954 Wakefield Model, by Ron Warring.

Starting with the 1954 Wakefield there is one major change in the specification. Size and minimum total weight of model remains as before but motor weight is to be restricted to a maximum of 80 grams of rubber (lubricated). It is not the purpose of this article to discuss whether the rule change is a good one or not (although my personal opinion is that it is a very bad one), but rather to examine the effect this new rule will have on Wakefield design.

For a start it will put a premium on good rubber. Limited to 80 grams or 2.82 ounces lubricated rubber weight, only the best rubber will do. The weight rule is equivalent to a maximum of just about 40 feet of lubricated 1/4 x 24 Perelli strip which I use and which will make up into the following motors:

12 strands-40 in long made up. 44 in long when broken in.
14 strands-34-1/2 in long made up. 38 in long when broken in.
16 strands-30 in long made up. 33 in long when broken in.

These possible motor lengths seem to indicate pretty clearly that both the long fuselage Wakefield and return-gear designs are ruled out for new Wakefields. The object of both these layouts is to use motors in a taut state in the fuselage. We can now use taut motors, if we wish, in fuselages of average length without the extra vulnerability of the long fuselage or com-plication of gears.

Modern Wakefields with 12 strand motors are capable of excellent and consistent performances even in poor conditions, but have relied very much on a long power run to ensure a four minute plus duration. Since we cannot now use a long, low power (i.e. small cross-section) motor, it becomes doubtful that anything less than a 14 strand motor will do. This can be accommodated taut between hook distances equal to 38" when fully broken in, which will probably set a standard for the longest fuselage lengths likely under the new rules, Such a motor will then take around 1,000 turns.

Before ruling out the geared model entirely, there is the possibility of splitting this 38 in motor length into two 19 in motors, and a short fuselage design with necessary tail moment given by a long tail boom carrying fin and stabilizer..."

1954 Wakefield, MAN, June 1953.

Direct submission to Outerzone.

Supplementary file notes

Article pages, thanks to RFJ.

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1954 Wakefield (oz10696) by Ron Warring from Model Airplane News 1953 - model pic

Datafile:
  • (oz10696)
    1954 Wakefield
    by Ron Warring
    from Model Airplane News
    June 1953 
    44in span
    Rubber F/F
    all formers complete :)
    got article :)
  • Submitted: 29/11/2018
    Filesize: 1018KB
    Format: • PDFbitmap
    Credit*: Circlip, RFJ

1954 Wakefield (oz10696) by Ron Warring from Model Airplane News 1953 - pic 003.jpg
003.jpg

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