Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter (oz10055)

 

Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter (oz10055) by Ralph Kuenz - plan thumbnail

About this Plan

Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter. Rubber scale model biplane.

From Cloudbuster Newsletter.

Direct submission to Outerzone.

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Datafile:
  • (oz10055)
    Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter
    by Ralph Kuenz
    19in span
    Scale Rubber F/F Biplane Military
    clean :)
    all formers complete :)
  • Submitted: 01/05/2018
    Filesize: 265KB
    Format: • PDFbitmap
    Credit*: Rottensox

ScaleType:
  • Sopwith_1½_Strutter | help
    see Wikipedia | search Outerzone


    ScaleType: This (oz10055) is a scale plan. Where possible we link scale plans to Wikipedia, using a text string called ScaleType.

    If we got this right, you now have a couple of direct links (above) to 1. see the Wikipedia page, and 2. search Oz for more plans of this type. If we didn't, then see below.


    Notes:
    ScaleType is formed from the last part of the Wikipedia page address, which here is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_1½_Strutter
    Wikipedia page addresses may well change over time.
    For more obscure types, there currently will be no Wiki page found. We tag these cases as ScaleType = NotFound. These will change over time.
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User comments

If it's a 1-1/2 Strutter then this should be a two seater, of course.
anon - 11/05/2018
Why? If you are unsure about the aviation history involved, maybe just taking 5 seconds to Google "Single seat strutter" would help. I found this straight away: "After the successful debut of the two-seat Sopwith 1½ Strutter fighter, RNAS ordered the Sopwith 9700 single-seat bomber among six new types for its own needs. At that time the Admiralty were planning great offensive air raids against Germany's industrial centers, but the lack of a suitable aeroplane delayed this idea. The first single-seat 1½ Strutter was delivered to the RNAS in June 1916, but official acceptance took place in August. At the same time the RFC also ordered the 1½ Strutter from Sopwith, and many subcontractors also began to build this type: Morgan & Co, Hooper, Mann & Egerton, and Westland completed 372 single-seat 1½ Strutters in total ...etc."
SteveWMD - 11/05/2018
The type's long range and stability were good qualities for a home defence fighter and it served with three home defence squadrons, No. 37, No. 44 and No. 78 Squadrons. Most of the 1½ Strutters supplied to home defence units had been built as two-seaters but many were converted "in the field" to single-seaters to improve performance. Some of these single-seaters were similar to the bomber variant, but others were of a different type, known (like similarly adapted Sopwith Camels) as the Sopwith Comic. The cockpit was moved back behind the wings and one or two Lewis guns, either mounted on Foster mountings or fixed to fire upwards, outside the arc of the propeller, replaced the synchronised Vickers. And this is it.
Pit - 12/05/2018
Ah, yes. Of course. Reading the plan for 5 seconds then googling the number A6906 even finds you a plastic Roden kit of this actual airframe https://www.scalemates.com/kits/137901-roden-407-sopwith-1-1-2-strutter-comic-fighter which was a single seater. Of course.
SteveWMD - 12/05/2018
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Scaling

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